August 7, 2014

Early Texas Documents Now Available in UHDL

We are pleased to announce Early Texas Documents is now available in the UH Digital Library!

This digital collection chronicles the history of Texas from the Spanish Colonial Era through the turn of the 20th century. The bulk of the collection is from the Colonial, Republic, and Early Statehood eras, and in addition to materials broadly documenting the history of Texas, the activities of several prominent Texans and Americans are also documented. The digital collection contains nearly 1300 items.



Included in the collection are papers pertaining to the establishment of Austin’s Colony, including land and legal documents signed by Stephen F. Austin. Sam Houston’s role as President of Texas is extensively documented through correspondence and legal, financial, and land papers. The roles of Anson Jones and Mirabeau Lamar as President of Texas are seen in legal and land paper, and James Morgan’s role as Colonel in the Texas Army is documented through correspondence, legal, and military papers. Finally, Andrew Jackson’s role as President of the United States of America is documented in a letter detailing his decision to not send troops to Texas during the state’s revolution.



Also of interest are slave documents within the collection documenting the sale of slaves as property as well as financial and scrip documents that detail a listing of goods and services purchased by individuals. Other items include illustrations of currency and warrants paid to soldiers for their service.

 

The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in the Early Texas Documents CollectionMany thanks to all those who helped make this digital collection possible. You can find more of our fascinating collections here at the UH Digital Library!

August 6, 2014

Check Out Our New Map View Feature!

We here at the UH Digital Library would like to show you the new and exciting Map View feature in both our Civil War Letters and Lucian Hood Architectural Drawings collections!


Both Civil War Letters and Lucian Hood Architectural Drawings are rooted in geography. Civil War Letters is a collection of more than 150 Civil War-era letters contains correspondence from  M.L. Calk, W.D. Lowther, and William W. Edgerton letters. Calk and Lowther were Confederate soldiers from Alabama and Texas, respectively, while Edgerton was a Union soldier from New York. 


 Utilizing Google Maps, Map View locates the origin of these Civil War letters, tracking Calk, Lowther, And Edgerton through their journeys across America. By zooming in, you will find that each letter has a pinpoint on the map which you can click to direct you to that very letter in our collection!


Utilize Google Maps Street View to see the 150-year change in time!


You can enjoy the same experience with Lucian Hood as well! Lucian Hood Architectural Drawings is a collection of 116 hand-drawn architectural sketches by architect Lucian Hood which include floor plans, interior and exterior elevations, foundations, and plots for various buildings throughout Houston.

Here's a sketch of Memorial Creole Apartments from 1966...

...and using Google Street View you can see that Memorial Creole Apartments are still here!


We are very proud of our latest addition to the UHDL experience, and we hope you enjoy. Make sure to check out our other wonderful collections here at the UH Digital Library!

July 21, 2014

Lucian T. Hood Architectural Drawings Now Available in UHDL

I am pleased to announce the Lucian T. Hood Architectural Drawings are now available in the UH Digital Library!

HOOD.P104

Through his early drawings, this digital collection captures architect Lucian Hood’s eye for detail and exemplifies his artistry and graphic skills. These drawings, done before architects were aided by AutoCAD and other drafting software, embody the craftsmanship and sense of detail from a bygone era. In all, the collection contains 116 drawings done by hand in pencil. The drawings include floor plans, interior and exterior elevations, foundations, and plots.

HOOD.P105


Many of the drawings are from Hood’s early work on residential homes, which are representative of the architectural trends and influences of the early 1960s. These homes, located throughout the Houston neighborhoods of River Oaks, Tanglewood, and Memorial, are highly sought after in the marketplace, and owners are often interested in the original drawings in order to restore the homes to their original specifications.

Hood was a 1952 graduate of the University of Houston who studied under Donald Barthelme. He was one of Houston’s early modernist architects and his work was in great demand for more than 40 years, from the 1950s through the 1990s.

HOOD.P111


The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in the Lucian T. Hood Architectural Collection.

Many thanks to all those who helped make this digital collection possible.

July 14, 2014

Photographs from the Leonor Villegas de Magnón Papers Collection Now Available in UHDL

We are pleased to announce the Photographs from the Leonor Villegas de Magnón Papers collection is now available in the UH Digital Library!

http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/ville/item/233/show/231


This collection contains 146 photographs and postcards related to Leonor Villegas de Magnón’s personal life, political activism with the international relief service La Cruz Blanca (the White Cross), and the Mexican Revolution. Photographs highlight Magnón’s pioneering work along the Mexico-Texas border as well as her relationships with fellow activists, participants of the Revolution, and friends and family.





Items in the collection are annotated in English and Spanish and include portraits, landscapes, and miscellaneous illustrations dating from 1894 to 1918. Notable individuals in the collection include Venustiano Carranza, Jovita Idar, Porfirio Díaz, Francisco Madero, and Pancho Villa.


Magnón, a Mexican citizen and life-long resident of Laredo, Texas, was a trailblazer and leading force on a variety of issues related to Mexicans and Mexican-Americans. Among her many accomplishments, Magnón founded and financed La Cruz Blanca to provide more organized medical assistance to soldiers wounded in the Mexican Revolution. More details on this work can be found in her autobiography, La Rebelde (the Lady Rebel). In the years after the Revolution, Magnón opened a bilingual school for children and contributed to female civic organizations in the U.S. and Mexico, traveling back and forth from Laredo until her death in 1955.


The original materials are available in UH Libraries’ Special Collections in the Leonor Villegas de Magnón Papers. Many thanks to those who made this collection possible. Make sure to check out this collection as well as our other fascinating collections here at the UH Digital Library!